The Truth About Temping

As a graduate, I’ve found it hard to land a job. Unfortunately, the job market isn’t what it used to be. If you have a degree, they reject you for not having enough work experience and if you have the latter but not the former, you’re equally doomed. Obviously, from this blog, I would like to go into journalism but it’s a tough industry to enter. I have a degree in Italian and Spanish but finding steady translating jobs is hard and I don’t have enough savings to up sticks and move abroad.

So approximately a month and a half ago, I walked into my local temping agency on the high street. It was incredible. It was like the answer to all my questions. I was greeted with smiles and reassurance that they would find me a job. I was assigned my own ‘job mentor’, if you like, a wonderful lady with whom I have an excellent rapport. In fact, in any other walk of life, she would probably be a friend of mine.

Unfortunately, things didn’t start off well. There was a gig in a local small town but I had to have DBS clearance, which took about a month to come through. I was beginning to get disheartened. In a whole month, I had only worked two days.

Herein lies the problem with temping. You have to be the best candidate for the role otherwise you won’t be put forward by the agency. You have to have all your references, CV and any certificates and qualifications up to date. You may get a phone call in the middle of the day asking if you could make it to the office within an hour or two to cover a shortage. You pretty much have to be available on the off chance that you’ll get a call to start work.

Despite all of the above, I love temping. It’s frustrating when you don’t have work because you never know when or where your next gig is going to happen. It’s not a reliable, steady income. But it is a hell of a lot of fun. You do earn more than the person who you’re replacing because temps generally get paid more than permanent, regular staff. Sometimes you’ll only work for a day at an office and other times, you could be working for three months in the same place. I’m kind of in love with the charm of never knowing what’s going to happen next. I think the thing I love the most about temping is the sheer amount of experience you get. You do work in similar sectors in every job but in completely different environments with people from all walks of life. You never know who you may meet! It’s the changing dynamics of every job that I really enjoy. Being thrown into different roles at different companies is really quite thrilling and there’s never a dull moment.  Usually, if there’s not a lot happening when you’re at work, you’re left to your own devices…so basically, I get paid for being on the internet, doing what I’d do at home, except I’m not in my pyjamas and I have to take the odd phone call here and there.

Temping has given me a wealth of experience already and I can’t wait to see what else is in store for me. In hindsight, I’m glad I didn’t get on to a grad scheme immediately after graduating. I know that when do get on to a scheme, I’ll have a plethora of skills and experience to help me in any situation thanks to temping!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Truth About Temping

    • jazzykinks says:

      I totally get what you mean, actually. I haven’t worked much since I started temping but I have found it fun and it’s allowed me to have a social life, which is making the transition from uni to adulthood easier. I guess I’m fortunate because I have a car so I can go to gigs that are further afield. I wish you all the best in your work!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s